Alan Zilberman

Alan Zilberman
Alan Zilberman's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Washington Post Washington City Paper Brightest Young Things

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
4.5/5 97% Marriage Story (2019) Parts of the film are sad, even heartbreaking, and yet Baumbach's commitment to his premise keeps it from being maudlin. It also happens to be quite funny. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2019
82% The Report (2019) This political procedural might sound too dry, but in Burns and Driver's hands, it is ferocious. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2019
4.5/5 96% The Irishman (2019) It has the wisdom that can only come with advanced age, and that wisdom coexists with heartache. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2019
62% Motherless Brooklyn (2019) Motherless Brooklyn is far from perfect-it is too long and a touch too indulgent-and yet audiences may find themselves returning to it in the years ahead. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 1, 2019
1/4 No Score Yet Unlikely (2019) The directors rely on gimmicky imagery and cloying musical cues, using Andra Day's "Rise Up" so often that its refrain begins to sound borderline cynical. - Washington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2019
2.5/5 79% Jojo Rabbit (2019) It is morally facile to assume that there is an innocent, warm-hearted kid under every youth-sized Nazi uniform. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2019
4.5/5 92% The Lighthouse (2019) It is a rare treat to watch great actors abandon the pretense of safety and good taste. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 18, 2019
99% Parasite (Gisaengchung) (2019) All of its elements-the natural performances, dense plotting, and staggering political implications-coalesce into an undeniably provocative whole. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
4.5/5 97% Pain and Glory (Dolor y gloria) (2019) The sort of exquisite, quietly observed film that gets its audience to lean forward. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
69% Joker (2019) Todd Phillips pulls his punches, so his film needles the audience, daring you to be upset about it. This is the cinematic equivalent of bullying. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2019
100% One Cut of the Dead (Kamera o tomeru na!) (2019) Zombie stories do not endure because they're original, but their very nature leads to a sense of camaraderie, and this one continues in that tradition. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
82% Memory: The Origins of Alien (2019) A good primer for those who have not considered the psychosexual possibilities of the chest-burster scene, or how the robot ultimately represents the patriarchy. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
68% Wrinkles the Clown (2019) It is like the director read the article on Wrinkles and thought he had an idea for a feature-length film, only to realize the premise is not enough to sustain it. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
87% Depraved (2019) It injects new life into a story that is essential to horror's DNA. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
86% Ms. Purple (2019) This is a film with a committed sense of sadness, although it is never cloying or manipulative. The characters are too proud for that, but they wish they could be stronger. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2019
4/5 88% Swallow (2019) By tying the hero's eating disorder to deeper psychological issues, Swallow has a lot to say about independence, womanhood, and self-determination. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2019
4/5 87% The Vast of Night (2019) It reminds us why we go to the movies, and how all those smoke and mirrors can tease out our sense of wonder. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2019
2.5/5 50% The Golden Glove (Der goldene handschuh) (2019) This is a film that will struggle to find an audience, unless there are people out there who thought Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer was too tame. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2019
91% Saint Maud (2019) There was a moment where the theater collectively gasped - you"ll know it when you see it - and that kind of terror is all too rare. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2019
65% Guns Akimbo (2019) It is the spiritual sequel to The Truman Show that we deserve. Our culture now craves a fanboy loser who somehow becomes a character in a John Woo movie. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2019
4.5/5 84% Ad Astra (2019) Pitt never reveals the full scope of what Roy feels, and that is the right choice. He invites us to see the man, while everyone around him only sees the mission. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 22, 2019
24% The Goldfinch (2019) Director John Crowley has the sensitivity and care to convey the book's emotions cinematically. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
1.5/4 63% It Chapter Two (2019) Real trauma is given the same consideration as a literal funhouse of horrors, which cheapens what the characters and audience are put through. - Washington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
3/5 39% Don't Let Go (Relive) (2019) The film somehow works. Maybe it's the forcefulness of the performances, or that the characters are just as confused as we are. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2019
96% Love, Antosha (2019) It's a celebration of a life well lived, and how a creative kid transitions into the beginnings of a serious artist. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 29, 2019
3.5/5 88% Ready or Not (2019) Blood will always be the funniest bodily fluid, and its capacity for comic shock is what might make the film an eventual midnight classic. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
4/5 99% One Child Nation (2019) It shrewdly uses China's one child policy to critique what can happen when a country attempts to control women's bodies. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2019
89% Blinded by the Light (2019) As anyone who has written bad high school poetry can attest, good intentions do not always lead to great art. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2019
5/5 86% The Nightingale (2019) Kent may set her film in the early 1800s, but it oozes with modern resonance since civil rights and civilization have done little to curb human nature. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 9, 2019
3.5/5 22% The Kitchen (2019) It eschews high art, favoring sleaze and bad taste, and still manages to be about something. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 9, 2019
3/4 59% Brian Banks (2019) [A] painful reminder of how young black people still face overwhelming disadvantages. - Washington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2019
92% David Crosby: Remember My Name (2019) His loneliness, creativity, and chronic illnesses left him with an uncertain path ahead. Now that he is pushing 80, walking that path is not quite heroic, but it's close. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 1, 2019
4/5 85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) This revisionist history embraces our best qualities while rejecting our worst impulses, so maybe underneath all that blood and pain, Tarantino is downright sappy. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2019
4/5 84% The Art of Self-Defense (2019) It is funny, but only because of its specificity and point of view. Behind that comedy, however, is a warning about what happens ordinary men trust the wrong teachers. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 19, 2019
53% The Lion King (2019) It is a colossal blunder, a film so artless and bland that it may confuse younger audiences. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2019
4/5 79% Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love (2019) Director Nick Broomfield involves himself in the story, indulging in revisionism of the 1960s, and yet the film's more emotional arc is ultimately more poignant than that. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
90% Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019) Far From Home is a mediocre Spider-Man film. Now that we have internalized the character's durability, genuine storytelling risks are the only way for the character to go forward. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2019
4.5/5 83% Midsommar (2019) Its emotional realism is important since what ultimately happens is so unseemly and appalling. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2019
2.5/5 63% Yesterday (2019) How come Richard Curtis is only capable of one type of romance? - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2019
No Score Yet Autonomy (2019) Education is the primary goal, which can be worthwhile for something that's actually on the frontier of automation and artificial intelligence, except this particular technology has been a known quantity for years. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2019
3/4 96% Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019) It doesn't matter whether you've have read all - or any - of Morrison books. Either way, you may leave the theater wanting to pick one up on the way home. - Washington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
2/5 32% Being Frank (2019) It needs strong performances to elevate its mediocrity, so instead we are left with a film straining for modest goals it cannot achieve. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2019
4/5 93% The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) The Last Black Man in San Francisco will not stop NIMBYism, but it remains an important, lyrical drama that strikes appropriate notes of anger and hope. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
4/5 90% Plus One (2019) Once you get past all the jokes about bad speeches and shuttles to the venue, there is a smart, winning romantic comedy that actually has something to say. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
56% The Dead Don't Die (2019) Since the film does not take itself too seriously, it invites us to relax and let its grimly deadpan worldview wash over us. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2019
3.5/4 69% Ghost Fleet (2019) By tackling their stories - and what they've endured - head on, it makes its point, leaving a bad taste in your mouth about that discounted tuna at your neighborhood supermarket. - Washington Post EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2019
23% Dark Phoenix (2019) Charles Xavier, Magneto, and Jean Grey are durable characters, but our patience for them is not. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2019
3/5 89% Rocketman (2019) Unlike Rami Malek, Egerton actually sings in Rocketman, and while his voice is not a replica of John's, it is soulful enough to actually be convincing. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
3.5/5 97% Deadwood: The Movie (2019) All the actors easily reprise their roles, finding notes of grace and savagery while recreating a stylized, hopeful view of how individuality can clash with civilization. - Brightest Young Things EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
41% Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019) Snow, rain, and smoke obscure the action, so the audience must squint to make any sense of how the monsters are fighting each other, or what city is under siege. - Washington City Paper EDIT
Read More | Posted May 30, 2019