Alex Heeney

Alex Heeney
Tomatometer-approved critic
Publications: Seventh Row
Critics' Group: Online Film Critics Society

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
98% Timbuktu (2015) As the story of a cross-section of the people living under the occupation of misogynistic Islamist extremists, you might expect Abderrahmane Sissako's Timbuktu to be bleak . It's the opposite. [TOP 50 FILMS OF THE DECADE] - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
99% Wadjda (2013) For years, aspiring feminists had Jo March; now, we have Wadjda. [TOP 50 FILMS OF THE DECADE] - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
95% Enough Said (2013) Holofcener finds the comedy in mid-life troubles without exploiting or making light of them, or being too bleak, and in so doing creates a very realistic portrait of a group of adults on the brink of major changes. [TOP 50 OF THE DECADE] - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 4, 2019
96% Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound (2019) With Making Waves, Midge Costin does something similar for sound in cinema [as Side by Side did for digital filmmaking], charting its history and innovations, many of which were tied to major sci-fi blockbusters. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2019
89% Bacurau (Nighthawk) (2019) Much of the pleasure of Bacurau is the deliberate precision with which Mendonça Filho and Dornelles slowly build up this tension. We see the signs of violence -- bullet holes in the water truck, a too-quiet town -- before we see the blood. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
83% Judy (2019) The film is often about how much Judy The Legendary Performer is something other people constructed, while Judy Garland is a regular woman with regular concerns: bills to pay, children to feed... Zellweger's performance toys with this dichotomy, too. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2019
97% Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Portrait de la jeune fille en feu) (2019) Céline Sciamma's gorgeous, heart-wrenching Portrait of a Lady on Fire screened on the first day of TIFF, and it became the gold standard by which I evaluated all other films. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 30, 2019
83% Ema (2019) Ema is a bizarre, colourful, pulsing, bonkers, and utterly invigorating cinematic experience. Part melodrama, part dance film, it defies categorization and even explanation: like dance itself, it has to be experienced to be understood. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 20, 2019
No Score Yet Comets (2019) Tamar Shavgulidze's quiet, lovely Comets is a film about memory, missed opportunities, and lost loves. At just 71-minutes, it's short and sweet, but packs an emotional punch thanks to strong performances. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
95% Rocks (2019) Sarah Gavron's chaotic and energetic new feature, Rocks, captures the indomitable spirit of the 15-year-old girl who gives the film its name, as well as her London group of friends. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
94% Corpus Christi (Boze cialo) (2020) Shot in icy blues, greens, and greys, this is a harsh, sad world with no happy endings... Yet Komasa finds humour in this premise, creating a wise satire of not just the church but the way people use their beliefs to justify their own bad behaviour. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
100% Hope (Håp) (2019) Søhdal tenderly depicts a marriage that is indeed a strong partnership, with years of built-up intimacies, and yet also how that relationship can be stifling, in part because of gendered expectations. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
No Score Yet Murmur (2019) Murmur ...[follows] a solitary middle-aged protagonist, Donna (Shan MacDonald)[, who] starts working at an animal rescue, and ends up taking many of the animals home to fill the companionship void in her life. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
87% Mouthpiece (2019) The best movie of the year, Mouthpiece, is Canadian, set in Toronto, and written and directed by women and about women... The dual performance...allows them to represent two sides of a complex woman who is constantly in conflict with herself. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
66% Peterloo (2019) Mike Leigh's Peterloo is a rare story about the fight for a fairer democracy: one of carnage rather than triumph, one that ends with tragedy and unfinished labour rather than success and social change. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
No Score Yet Noura's Dream (Noura rêve) (2019) Throughout, Noura weathers every indignation quietly, not because she's unwilling to fight for herself, but because she's picking her battles. In this world where men reign, and rarely leave Noura's frame, the only way to survive is to play the game. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 19, 2019
89% Rocketman (2019) The film's framing device was a neat idea, though poorly executed...It wasn't a good sign that I spent much of Rocketman thinking about how incredibly talented and underused Jamie Bell is. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
80% Late Night (2019) Unfortunately, Late Night has little to offer beyond Thompson's wardrobe, and of course Thompson herself. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
40% Vita & Virginia (2019) The film's greatest strength is as a showcase for Debicki, one of the most talented actresses working today, who perfectly embodies Woolf's genius and vulnerability. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
94% The Ground Beneath My Feet (Der Boden unter den Füssen) (2019) The Ground Beneath My Feet thus raises the age-old and sadly still relevant question: can a woman ever be truly free when living in the patriarchy? - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
95% Queen of Hearts (2019) Shot in icy blues and whites and among the hard edges of a modernist home, there's nothing very comfortable about this environment; el-Toukhy doesn't want us to get cosy. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
80% Dolce Fine Giornata (2019) Its ideas are a bit inchoate, and the final image of the film is so obvious you leave with the pang of being hit over the head with a blunt object. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
96% The Last Tree (2019) The Last Tree really makes us feel the systemic troubles Femi faces. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
88% The Sharks (Los tiburones) (2019) Unfortunately, Garibaldi finds few shades to Rosina's characterization, exploring neither her broader life nor her sexuality in much depth. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
83% This is not Berlin (2019) At times a bit clunky, This is not Berlin is a lot of fun most of the time, and Ponce de León is both a beautiful and a compelling presence. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
97% Dirty God (2019) Jade is resilient but desperate. So even when the film's script requires her to do some incredibly stupid things, she recovers and we keep rooting for her. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
No Score Yet Volontaire (2018) ...worth a watch for this albeit limited look at what it's like to be a woman who suddenly finds herself ensconced in the military when that was never previously an ambition. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
100% Keep an Eye Out (Au Poste!) (2018) At just 73 minutes, Quentin Dupieux's absurdist black comedy Keep an Eye Out is an amusing trifle that doesn't outstay its welcome even though it doesn't quite stick the landing. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
83% The Trouble with You (En liberté!) (2018) The Trouble with You comes out mostly clean with just a few uncomfortably prejudiced jokes. But for the most part, it's an absurd and hilarious romantic comedy, in which Hanael offers perfect comic timing in a self-serious performance... - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
100% Our Body (2018) Han Ka-ram's first feature is a thoughtful and sensitive look at late twenties malaise, female friendship, and the way both of these can turn into an obsession with the body. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
100% The Fireflies Are Gone (La disparition des lucioles) (2018) Sébastien Pilote's third feature is a buoyant, colourful, and often very funny coming-of-age story about a clever and cynical teenager. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
100% Falls Around Her (2018) With minimal dialogue, Naponse and Cardinal give us a portrait of a complex and sexual woman with desires and interests, a sad rarity in cinema. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
67% The Extraordinary Journey of Celeste Garcia (El viaje extraordinario de Celeste García) (2018) What starts out as an absurd premise start to lose steam in the final act as the film focuses more on Celeste's inward journey of self-discovery - and less on the light satire of Cuban bureaucracy. Still, it's an utterly enjoyable ride. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
90% ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch (2019) It's a useful update and a strong reminder of the global nature of a problem that cannot be isolated by borders. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
95% Buddy (2019) Honigmann approaches each of the dogs and their owners as people in a mutually beneficial relationship full of love and trust. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2019
No Score Yet Push (2019) It's depressing to learn that, around the world, cities are becoming so expensive that the people who work in them are being priced out. Fortunately, someone like Farha is out there, trying to find solutions on a global scale. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2019
94% Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool (2019) Birth of Cool does an excellent job contextualizing Davis' music as ever-evolving. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
96% Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am (2019) Morrison's boundless joie de vivre and miraculous way with words make her the ideal documentary subject. The film serves as a great primer on her fiction that leave you with an urgent reading list. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
89% Sonja - The White Swan (2019) Even though it's set in the 1930s-1950s, Sewitsky features contemporary music throughout - a reminder that Henie's sexual liberty, financial independence, and business acumen made her a very modern woman. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
83% Koko-di Koko-da (2019) The film's psychological insights lack depth, but the craft is exceptional. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
100% Advocate (2019) Even when the courts prove brutally unjust, Tsemel's belief that things will eventually change is an inspiring one. She keeps fighting the good fight. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
99% The Tale (2018) What makes Fox's film so remarkable is its ability to hold these contradictory ideas simultaneously without ever presenting their coexistence as a paradox. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2018
93% Journey's End (2018) These performances dovetail nicely with Dibb's intention to keep us in the soldiers' headspace. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2018
81% The Party (2018) Potter clearly takes inspiration from theatre, but The Party is specifically cinematic...it works on film because though these characters are three-dimensional, the precision with which Potter points out hypocrisies means we're already in satire. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2018
86% Sergio and Sergei (2017) It's a crowd-pleasing delight. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
89% Meditation Park (2017) With warmth and humour, [Mina] Shum subtly addresses the trauma and isolation of the immigration experience, as well as the challenges faced by second generation immigrants because of their parents' lasting trauma. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
91% Beast (2018) A fascinating look at the lies we tell ourselves about ourselves, the parts we play for other people, and the mix of freedom and danger that comes from cutting loose. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
100% Waru (2017) These are important, emotionally impactful stories that are too rarely told. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
91% Lean on Pete (2018) [Lean on Pete] leaves you almost unexpectedly gutted by the deck Charlie's been dealt, but inspired by his resilience. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
67% On Chesil Beach (2018) [On Chesil Beach] proves [Dominic] Cooke is just as much of a talent to watch on screen as on stage. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017