Emily Yoshida

Emily Yoshida
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
93% Sword of Trust (2019) Sword of Trust feints at being an Ideas movie, but really only wants to hang - which is certainly not a crime, but given the subject matter, and These Times, it's a little disappointing. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
96% Hail Satan? (2019) Lane's film asks us: Is this not only what democracy looks like, but what religion looks like? - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 18, 2019
74% Guava Island (2019) The Glover brothers and Murai have, as ever, no shortage of big questions and ideas to build their stories around... - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 14, 2019
73% Teen Spirit (2019) It's a star-is-born story that, like its protagonist, is an empty vessel: anonymous and devoid of soul perhaps in an effort to be a surface onto which anyone could project, yet dull enough that few will want to. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2019
47% Little (2019) As many times as I tried to get onboard with its proposed brand of breezy fun, it kept kicking me off, if only because I found myself running up against the very foundation of its premise. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 12, 2019
39% The Dirt (2019) Its own pointlessness may keep The Dirt from feeling like an actual affront to humanity, but that doesn't make it very good, either. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 23, 2019
77% The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley (2019) Perhaps a ten-hour-long, O.J.: Made in America-style docuseries could satisfyingly address the systematic, cultural context of Elizabeth Holmes; that's not this film by a long shot. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 19, 2019
54% Five Feet Apart (2019) Due credit... should be given to Sprouse and particularly Richardson for selling all of these reheated tropes to their full potential. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2019
97% Booksmart (2019) Booksmart manages to be inclusive and progressive, without being precious about anything or sacrificing an ounce of humor. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2019
100% Everybody's Everything (2019) Everybody's Everything arrives at some kind of truth about the risks and rewards of an artist with seemingly no boundaries, personal or otherwise. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
93% Us (2019) Us feels like something meant to be watched over and over until the tape wears down, and we graft our own meaning and nightmares onto it. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2019
86% The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind (2019) The film remains too mannered for its own good; it's unquestionably nice and well-intentioned, but lacking momentum. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2019
70% Climax (2019) Climax is the best Noé has been in ages, and perhaps the most humane film he's ever done. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2019
92% Fighting with My Family (2019) What makes it memorable are its funny, sad little corners of very specific humanity. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 19, 2019
44% What Men Want (2019) What Men Want is a wildly uneven stretch of a movie that's more of a flail than a romp. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 8, 2019
85% The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part (2019) The brilliance of Lord and Miller's film is the way in which, even more so than in its predecessor, the meta story informs the mini-figures' story... - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2019
61% Alita: Battle Angel (2019) Alita: Battle Angel is an engaging piece of thoroughly computer-generated action pop, hokey and amiable and filled with enough set pieces to never drag. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2019
86% We Are Little Zombies (2019) A rainbow-colored scream into the abyss, Nagahisa's story of a quartet of orphaned tweens who start a chiptune rock band is as rigorous in its exploration of grief as it is stylistically exuberant... - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 31, 2019
81% The Lodge (2019) As a psychological down-is-up horror movie, The Lodge has a few solid tricks up its sleeve. But when the smoke and mirrors clear, it's ultimately a story about trauma, and a rather bleak one at that. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2019
63% Velvet Buzzsaw (2019) Velvet Buzzsaw is perhaps the first-ever art-world horror satire, but it has the feeling of a bawdy night at a mystery dinner or an anti-Establishment mummers play - and I mean this in the most complimentary way possible. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2019
56% Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile (2019) If the narrative film only exists to give us the unsettling sliminess of Efron as Bundy, it won't be a total waste. But it's not much of a movie, either. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2019
99% The Farewell (2019) The little dramas and themes that emerge during the reunion of the film's far-flung brood become, like a family, more than the sum of its individual parts, and an incredibly satisfying meal of a film. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 27, 2019
79% Late Night (2019) What makes Late Night - otherwise a largely predictable story in a familiar mold - really pop is Kaling's script, which is at the blunter and frankly more exciting spectrum of what Kaling has proven herself to be capable of in her writing career thus far. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2019
97% Honey Boy (2019) In many ways [it] resembles other films about chaotic childhoods, alcoholism, and abuse. It distinguishes itself in the manner it weaves the concerns of an actor into that trauma. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2019
89% The Kid Who Would Be King (2019) Cornish is offering a kind of movie they just don't make anymore - expansive live-action adventure tales unabashedly aimed at young people, not the adults charged with taking them to the cinema. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2019
20% Polar (2019) Polar is an execrable motion picture, a sad, lint-filled key bump scraped together from the bottom of the post-Tarantino '90s exploitation baggie. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2019
41% The Upside (2019) It's a film that contains complicated, sad, interesting ideas rarely expressed on screen... but whose package is fundamentally unsuited to showcase those ideas, like a sweater with the holes in all the wrong places. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 11, 2019
66% The House with a Clock in Its Walls (2018) I found my attention wandering. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 7, 2019
44% American Hangman (2019) American Hangman is college-level death penalty discourse, appropriately armed with what appears to be a college-level production budget. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2019
50% Escape Room (2019) Escape Room's PG-13 rating doesn't allow for a lot of blood or gore, but it's not missed, and Robitel finds plenty of other ways to keeps his finger on the tension button throughout the film's 100 minutes. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 3, 2019
93% Stan & Ollie (2019) The toll that show business takes on such relationships and on Laurel and Hardy's relationship with each other is never hit on the head, but feels real nevertheless. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 26, 2018
63% Bird Box (2018) I care as much about the people who ran around in its fiction now as I did before I watched them for two hours, which is to say, not at all. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 21, 2018
99% Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (2018) This kind of subtle richness is not new for Kore-Eda, though it's as satisfying here as it's ever been. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2018
45% Second Act (2018) It sends so many mixed messages over the course of its 104 minutes that it probably succeeds in its true goal: to give off the general patina of something that could ostensibly be all things to all women. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 20, 2018
35% Welcome to Marwen (2018) Welcome to Marwen is a totally confounding movie. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 19, 2018
27% Mortal Engines (2018) It's well-designed as a means to transport and entertain effectively. It's for you. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2018
65% Aquaman (2018) Aquaman's as formulaic, excessively thrashy, and mommy-obsessed as any other entry in the DCEU, but its visual imagination is genuinely exciting and transportive, and dare I say, fun. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2018
60% Tyrel (2018) Silva makes a chamber orchestra of unconscious prejudice and passive-aggression out of his all-bro ensemble, with Mitchell's performance as the violin solo at the center of it that grows from a tentative tremolo to lonesome wail. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2018
61% Vox Lux (2018) Vox Lux is a failure, but one I can't stop thinking about. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2018
97% Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018) Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse feels like the first major animated film in ages to actively try something stylistically new that didn't involve proprietary Scandinavian building blocks. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2018
63% Mary Queen of Scots (2018) A kind of nothing of a film. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 6, 2018
91% Mirai (2018) Like Hayao Miyazaki, whose mantle Hosoda is often considered to be on an unofficial short list to pick up, Hosoda tells this child's story at a child's eye level, and the diversions feel part and parcel of that point of view. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2018
15% Robin Hood (2018) Even on a technical level, Robin Hood is impossible to follow anywhere. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2018
77% The Clovehitch Killer (2018) Skiles's film doesn't care so much if you think you know how it ends, even if you're right. It's all about twisting the knife in the process of confirming those fears. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2018
95% Jinn (2018) Jinn is a special little film, one that never lets its complicated, contradictory characters become abstractions, but instead revels in all the disparate elements that make them who they are. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 15, 2018
81% Overlord (2018) Overlord's problem is that it doesn't seem terribly interested in showing us who its villains are, and thus significantly mutes the satisfaction of watching them get flamethrowered to death. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 9, 2018
40% The Girl in the Spider's Web (2018) Even a talent like Foy ends up feeling lost and without motivation, which feels especially glaring as the story bears down on its "she'll have to face her past" plot device. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 6, 2018
89% A Private War (2018) Heineman's film is, in many ways, the movie so many people say they want: a portrait of a deeply complex, flawed, but brilliant and forceful woman. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2018
33% The Nutcracker and the Four Realms (2018) There's nothing grounding enough here; everything - the sets, the costumes, the performances - seems to drift off in a CGI haze. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2018
100% Shirkers (2018) It sends you wondering at all the wild creativity and genius of young irrepressible women lost to time, held up or buried by the domineering egos of men. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 25, 2018