Poulomi Das

Poulomi Das
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
89% Blinded by the Light (2019) [Gurinder] Chadha makes every scene sing with her tender touches - the gentleness of adulation and the heartfelt intensity of a fan who owes the world to her favourite star. - The Hindu Business Line EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
71% The Sky Is Pink (2019) When the film's blatant lack of depth - it occasionally feels overstuffed and distracted - threatens to overpower its pleasures, it is redeemed by the effortlessness of the performances. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 11, 2019
88% Diego Maradona (2019) Even though its frenetic, dizzying pace can sometimes feel like it is detrimental to its ambition, Diego Maradona... gets close to questioning whether the responsibility a football legend had... is worth the self-destruction. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 10, 2019
71% War (2019) The film's charm is aided by the fact that both the actors share an electric chemistry and the action set-pieces thrill with their fluid choreography, and occasional ingenuity. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 2, 2019
96% The Lunchbox (2014) It's a terrific metaphor for Mumbai. After all, the city like its inhabitants, is never satiated. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 24, 2019
45% The Zoya Factor (2019) The Zoya Factor feels especially let down by Sharma's insistence to take refuge in crowd-pleasing spoofy filmmaking, which after a while gets too laboured, too on-the-nose, and too silly to even be entertaining. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 24, 2019
No Score Yet Aunty Sudha, Aunty Radha (2019) It's admirable how Chandra tackles urgent themes that are embedded in the layers of the portrait she paints of the gentle, unbreakable bond between two codependent sisters. - The Hindu Business Line EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2019
50% Dream Girl (2019) Dream Girl never comes close to doing justice or even giving its own spin to any of these templates, ending up as a jumbled-up outing that says nothing in its greed to say a little bit of everything. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2019
70% Section 375 (2019) Under the veneer of socially conscious filmmaking, Section 375 instead, reduces both, sexual assault and the Me Too movement into broad stereotypes - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2019
58% Chhichhore (2019) Nitesh Tiwari's Chhichhore is a pleasant entertainer elevated by the strength of its supporting cast. It's also an unabashed acknowledgement of male failure. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 6, 2019
9% Saaho (2019) It's not like anyone was expecting or demanding Saaho to be intelligent. But the fact that the film isn't even tolerable, is indefensible. The least Saaho could have done is not thwarted its own potential. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 30, 2019
97% American Factory (2019) American Factory gains from its decision to rely on the workers to voice the complexities of labour rights. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2019
85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood can't help but become its ending, emanating a sense of incompleteness. But through it all, it remains deeply watchable and its craft, genuinely persuasive. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2019
62% Mission Mangal (2019) The film's casual sidelining of its actresses stands out, given how it deceives the audience into believing in its feminism while simultaneously making jokes at the expense of its women. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2019
83% Share (2019) Pippa Bianco deconstructs the unique complexities of modern survivorship with a sobering portrait of just how much it takes to be an assault survivor in an age where the internet doesn't let go of the memory of you. - The Hindu Business Line EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2019
No Score Yet Jabariya Jodi (2019) In 2019, there is really no reason that a film like Jabariya Jodi, that suggests forced marriage is a matter of joke, should exist or get backed by a mainstream production house. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 9, 2019
No Score Yet Hum Aapke Hain Koun...! (What Am I to You...!) (1994) It mixes comedy, tragedy, helplessness, and an impending feeling of doom to create an all-consuming investment in a cinematic death. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 6, 2019
64% Judgementall Hai Kya (2019) The casting of Ranaut is nothing short of inspired. It's precisely why it's frustrating to see Judgementall Hai Kya be that film which ignores its engrossing roots in favour of meandering social messaging. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2019
99% The Tale (2018) By emphasising how little Fox could trust her memory, The Tale forces us to discern that when someone is assaulted, so is their mind - blocking their own memories becomes not only their language, but also their instant cure. - The Hindu Business Line EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
79% Photograph (2019) In the real world, Miloni [Sanya Malhotra] and Rafi [Nawazuddin Siddiqui] would never get the luxury of a happily-ever-after, which is why witnessing them longing to get away from their isolated existences feels so rewarding. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
76% Pad Man (2018) The film has the emotional heft of sandpaper. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
94% Mard Ko Dard Nahi Hota (2019) Mard Ko Dard Nahi Hota is at once an affectionate paean to childhood dreams without any filters of practicality as well as a tender tribute to a life spent at the movies. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
90% Dum Laga Ke Haisha (2015) What made the film revolutionary wasn't just that it starred an overweight actor essaying its overweight heroine . It was the fact that for the first time, a young heroine completely refused to treat it as an inadequacy. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
58% Padmaavat (2018) No wonder the Rajput Karni Sena is so adamant that no one should ever watch Padmavaat. It is a semi-historical reminder of how bad the Rajputs' track record in battle has been. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
93% Us (2019) As Get Out made evident, [Jordan] Peele can be regarded as an attentive filmmaker with the mind of an anthropologist. Us doesn't just further that reputation, but also cements the expansive scope of his ambitions. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
50% Blackmail (2018) Irrfan khan's blackmail taps something very accurate about the monsters that reside in all of us -- a part that we're happy to deny. All that the film needed, was to be a bit more brutal in the assessment of its evil lead. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
45% Pari (2018) Not only does Pari shy away from drowning itself in the worst horror tropes but it also peppers the film's proceedings and story with quirks, and twists that although not unique, seem at least accomplished. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
55% Hichki (2018) Hichki suffers from the same condition that afflicts most films with a social message: a severe case of good intentions that justifies the lack of risks. - Qrius EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
33% Super 30 (2019) The film's biggest failure is towards its subject: Bahl tells us even less about the genius mind of Anand Kumar, even though Roshan occupies almost every frame of Super 30. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
60% Lootera (2013) It's a rare cinematic outing that exploits the camera and its frames to contextualize the intensity of its storytelling and the restraint of its lead performances, instead of it being the other way round. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 8, 2019
No Score Yet Gully Life: The Story of Divine (2019) The uneven Gully Life is at its most enthralling when it allows the affable Fernandes to freely inject his carefree, grounded personality into its screen-time, without hurrying him up. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 2, 2019
89% Article 15 (2019) Despite its flaws, it'd be remiss to not acknowledge the sheer pluckiness of Article 15. That a film doesn't barely tip-toe around caste and dives into its impenetrable hold over biases alone, justifies its necessity. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2019
25% Kabir Singh (2019) A piece of irresponsible, offensive filmmaking that reveals just how harmful men can be to themselves and to the woman in their lives and still refuse to apologise for it. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2019
55% Game Over (2019) Yet enjoying the film also comes with a caveat: the more you want to read in between the lines of its wildly satisfying payoff, the less interesting it becomes. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
90% Always Be My Maybe (2019) Always be My Maybe might not be perfect, but it does put its weight behind a flawless romantic theory: Love after all, is a delicate dance of compromise, just not of a woman's career. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
29% Bharat (2019) At almost three hours, Bharat is an excruciating watch, which is exacerbated by the fact that neither Khan's acting or dancing skills looks like they're in any mood to ever improve. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
73% The Perfection (2019) If one were to rip apart the context of sexual abuse from the narrative, it would be reduced to just being a 90-minute-long bag of tricks. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 4, 2019
No Score Yet PM Narendra Modi (2019) A trifecta of awful writing, acting, and filmmaking, PM Narendra Modi's ridiculous alt-narratives take a sinister turn when it presents its "version" of the Godhra riots. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted May 24, 2019
83% Aamis (Ravening) (2019) Much of the brilliance of the genre-hybrid Aamis is in its steadfast refusal to commit. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2019
25% De De Pyaar De (2019) De De Pyaar De, which has its rare moments, never holds up: It's no different than innumerable Hindi films that lets its hero get what he wants over the course of two hours. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted May 17, 2019
7% Student of the Year 2 (2019) Even discarded scripts must have more complexity than Student of the Year 2. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted May 13, 2019
100% Knock Down the House (2019) Knock Down the House serves primarily as a searing examination of power and its glaring inaccessibility - specifically in a democracy. - Hyperallergic EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
63% Omertà (2018) It is about as effective as a dramatised Wikipedia entry - there is nothing in its 96-minute runtime that we don't already know. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
58% 102 Not Out (2018) Despite his guilt-inducing tactics, the only message that 102 Not Out ironically disseminates is the abject need for educating our birth-givers in the language of parental independence. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
100% Raazi (2018) Raazi manages to nuance the idea of patriotism, and lace it with a conscience. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
50% Veere Di Wedding (2018) It's as if Veere Di Wedding refuses to have any emotional depth only because it fears that its protagonists might have to talk about something other than men. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
45% Bhavesh Joshi Superhero (2018) The third act of the film is essentially a lesson in misdirection... - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
100% Lust Stories (2018) What makes Akhtar's short groundbreaking is its unflinching articulation of the hypocrisies of the entitled middle class. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
89% Hereditary (2018) The film takes the saying "skeletons in the closet" literally, giving us a genuinely terrifying portrait of a family's breakdown. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019
36% Sanju (2018) It doesn't just heroise a flawed personality, but also ends up as the definitive and selective account for the future. - Arré EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2019