Richard Brody

Richard Brody
Richard Brody's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker
Publications: New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
82% Ad Astra (2019) The canniness of Gray's procedure is matched by the boldness, even the recklessness, of the extremes to which he pushes it-along with his characters, his story, his emotions, and his techniques. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 20, 2019
26% The Goldfinch (2019) This sprawling yet rushed adaptation of Donna Tartt's novel is textureless and flavorless. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2019
No Score Yet Moment by Moment (1978) A superb romantic melodrama... - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2019
100% América (2018) [T]he movie's fusion of medical, legal, and personal issues echoes far beyond its short span, and it briefly reaches grand philosophical heights in discussions of América's state of mind and emotional life. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 13, 2019
88% Hustlers (2019) Scafaria insightfully builds the action around the two women's interviews with a journalist, but the duo's methods... are all but elided in favor of a heartwarming tale of friendship, family, and shopping. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
61% The Sound of Silence (2019) An exciting idea and a cast with the flair to convey it go to waste in this overplotted, underdeveloped science-fiction mood piece. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2019
88% Ready or Not (2019) This horror comedy muffs both the humor and the drama. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2019
100% Mr. Klein (1976) Both a work of history, unstinting in its concrete depiction of political hatred and fear, and a portrait of the metaphysics of tyranny-a classic of doppelgänger paranoia that gathers the theme on a single string and pulls it into modernity. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 9, 2019
96% Our Hospitality (1923) Buster Keaton's ingenuity, acrobatics, and romanticism flourish equally in this antic twist on melodrama... - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2019
76% Afterglow (1997) The actors deliver their lines with stark and declamatory fervor, and their gestures have a sharp, sculptural stillness that's reminiscent of the grand artifices of classic-Hollywood productions. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 2, 2019
46% Where'd You Go, Bernadette (2019) As Bernadette, Cate Blanchett is forced to do the work that Linklater doesn't devote to developing the story or characters. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2019
88% Roozi ke zan shodam (The Day I Became a Woman) (2001) A masterwork of symbolic cinema; it depicts, with vast imagination, the ordeals faced by women in modern Iranian society. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2019
80% This is not Berlin (2019) Family tragedy, legal matters, and the World Cup all zip through the drama, which has a miniseries' worth of incidents that get dispatched in quick, merely informational scenes filmed with little style or imagination. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2019
96% Jawline (2019) [Mandelup] rushes from clip to clip, from sound bite to sound bite; the results are superficial and frustrating. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2019
82% Party Girl (1958) Ray's direction, with its garish, searing streaks of color (red has rarely slashed the screen so violently), sharp diagonals, and quickly lurching wide-screen views, reflects its characters' raging energies and inner conflicts. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2019
95% Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool (2019) The movie's simple arc and conventional contours flatten both the passionate originality of Davis's music and the destructive chaos of his life. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2019
97% American Factory (2019) The filmmakers' probing analysis reveals the basic principles of freedom and dignity within the political essence of labor issues. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2019
79% Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (2019) Øvredal's sense of horror is neither notably stark nor significantly ornamental; it's nearly textureless, as if it had been squeezed from a tube. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 16, 2019
88% Blinded by the Light (2019) It's a dream of inclusion that feels narrow, a vision of liberation that feels constrained, a view of progress that feels like a lockstep into the future. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2019
100% Two Weeks in Another Town (1962) One of the sharpest and most perceptive movies about the film industry. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2019
71% The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1973) Dixon launches the film with a satirical tone-mocking white officials who'd rather not integrate the agency-and sharpens it to an edge of restrained precision, aided by Cook's highly pressurized performance. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 12, 2019
85% Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988) Coppola tells this story with grand exuberance without masking the personal and historical tragedies that it involves. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 9, 2019
22% The Kitchen (2019) It hints frustratingly, throughout, at a comedic impulse that the direction of its actors suppresses. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
99% Honeyland (2019) Its narrative construction depicts extraordinary tensions and conflicts with a clarity and coherence that a screenwriter might dream of. At the same time, the film's dramatic power comes at the expense of the reportorial side of documentary filmmaking. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 2, 2019
85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) Tarantino has become a nudnik filmmaker, who grabs a viewer by the lapel and says-and says and says-what's on his mind. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 29, 2019
99% One Child Nation (2019) [A] boldly confrontational and journalistically probing documentary... - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 29, 2019
56% Old Boyfriends (1979) Tewkesbury evokes a Hitchcockian depth of subjectivity in what is essentially a first-person survey of women's hidden terrors. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 29, 2019
100% Criss Cross (1949) A hectic fusion of on-location texture and stylish artifice. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
82% Crawl (2019) For viewers seeking summertime relief from the intellectual burden of superhero movies, there's this accidentally funny and numbingly literal action thriller. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
89% Cassandro the Exotico! (2019) [Losier] revels in Cassandro's offstage charisma and in his acrobatic artistry while also revealing the authentic violence of the sport's blatant artifice. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 15, 2019
93% Sword of Trust (2019) [Lynn] Shelton weaves multiple coils of rage into a tense and volatile mechanism that... yields bold and surprising implications for politics at large and for modes of resistance. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
63% Yesterday (2019) Yesterday is ultimately a romantic comedy, but a conceptually complex one, built on a peculiarly reactionary framework of private life and a culturally conservative pop classicism. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2019
83% Midsommar (2019) The movie revels in sadistic gore and lurid sex, and its main ideas-anti-ethnographic skepticism and American cultural self-sufficiency-are petty and narrow. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 1, 2019
93% Rolling Thunder Revue: A Bob Dylan Story By Martin Scorsese (2019) It's not a doomed mission but it's a delicate and a difficult one, and the project collapses under the weight of its contradictory goals and its scattershot strategies to meet them. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet El diablo nunca duerme (2012) The emotional intensity of the passionate reminiscences and revelations that Portillo's subjects share turns them, for the time that they're onscreen, into the expressive equals of movie stars. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2019
No Score Yet Baara (1978) The movie runs only ninety minutes but captures grand social forces in microcosm, evoking public and private violence, intimate and civic corruption in teeming images that fill frames with richly textured action... - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
89% Rocketman (2019) "Rocketman" is far from a drama of introspection-and, unfortunately, Egerton's performance, as directed by Fletcher, doesn't add to the protagonist's inner life. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
80% Late Night (2019) While "Late Night" approaches these themes mildly and cautiously, it nonetheless discerns and dramatizes some of the current-day entertainment industry's most urgent themes and conflicts. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2019
93% The Last Black Man in San Francisco (2019) Fails has handed over to Talbot the intricate and fragile treasures of a lifetime, and Talbot has melted them down and reshaped them into something smooth, shiny, and hollow. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
100% Il Posto (1963) Olmi's intimate camerawork captures his amateur performers' delicate range of inflections, hesitations, and glimmers of feeling as their inhibitions and embarrassments begin to curdle into weary bitterness. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
55% The Dead Don't Die (2019) An exuberantly imaginative yet grimly political fable about a world thrown literally out of whack by "polar fracking." - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
No Score Yet Keep It For Yourself (1991) Denis's poetic vision of downbeat downtown solitude is romantic and whimsical, lyrical and melancholy... - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 3, 2019
No Score Yet Tux and Fanny (2019) Birney's direction, for all its giddy inventiveness, is also precise and emotionally calibrated. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
72% The Perfection (2019) It's a trite jumble that confronts its ripped-from-the-news theme as an impersonal check box. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
54% Ma (2019) There's nothing but the immediate mechanics of the plot and a straightforward stoking of revulsion, fear, and gratification. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 31, 2019
No Score Yet Interview (1971) Ranju's frantic dashes through the city are filled with the print ads, billboards, store displays, and movie posters that he sees, which Sen presents as a crucial form of political mind control and a prime target of any future revolution. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2019
89% The Souvenir (2019) In the end, "The Souvenir" is a movie about experience that doesn't itself offer much of an experience. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 27, 2019
88% Xala (1975) Sembène depicts a corrupt system that replaced white dictators and profiteers with black ones; the symbolic ending, a glimmer of revolutionary hope, is as gratifying as it is implausible. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 27, 2019
33% Domino (2019) The political intrigue is stale and stereotyped, the characters might as well be windup toys, and the gore is repulsive and gratuitous. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 27, 2019
97% Booksmart (2019) Its substance is scantly developed, its clear and simple premise dismayingly oversimplified. Despite the emotional authenticity of the protagonists' dilemma, their journey comes off as a fantasy. - New Yorker EDIT
Read More | Posted May 22, 2019