Ryan Gilbey

Ryan Gilbey
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
100% So Long, My Son (Di jiu tian chang) (2019) Its power lies in the non-chronological structure, as well as the tantalising slowness with which vital information is revealed. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2019
97% Knives Out (2019) [Rian] Johnson throws in every theatrical prop he can think of and ensures that the film is both as amusing as send-ups like Clue or Murder By Death and as robust as any Christie classic. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 2, 2019
95% Atlantics (2019) The cinematographer Claire Mathon has form when it comes to making water a character in its own right. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2019
96% Marriage Story (2019) It is [Scarlett] Johansson and [Adam] Driver who give the picture its weight, clarifying movingly the couple's love for one another even as they're falling apart. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2019
96% The Irishman (2019) The picture's virtues, and its affectingly plangent mood, outweigh any not-so-special effects. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2019
85% Sorry We Missed You (2020) It's rarely said about salt-of-the-earth characters that their strongest component is usually sugar. Even so, the screenwriter Paul Laverty, a long-time collaborator of [Ken] Loach's, has found nuance and wiggle-room. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 31, 2019
83% Official Secrets (2019) Gavin Hood's Official Secrets isn't a poor film so much as an unremarkable one, and if there is any suspense or stylistic innovation to be wrung from this important story then the director is keeping it under his hat. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 24, 2019
87% Non-Fiction (Doubles vies) (2019) [Olivier] Assayas's innate interest in character prevents it from being dry or dusty. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 17, 2019
53% Farming (2019) [Adewale] Akinnuoye-Agbaje's slightly numbed screenplay never gets to grips with who Eni is, resorting instead to using other characters' observations to define him. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2019
69% Joker (2019) While the script makes Arthur pitiable, [Joaquin] Phoenix preserves his humanity... he's good enough to make the movie seem better than it is - but even he can't make his character consistent. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2019
41% The Laundromat (2019) Each frivolous touch designed to make the financial trickery go down more smoothly has the effect of weakening the dramatic material. The larky tone means that none of it sticks, none of it matters. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2019
84% Ad Astra (2019) Expeditions to Mars are all very well, but Ad Astra is only really interested in reaching the planet Closure, with its twin moons of father and son. That's not enough to hang a movie on, even one as handsome as this. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2019
84% Downton Abbey (2019) You half expect the twist of the film to be that these aren't early-20th century aristocrats at all, but a group of former thespians convinced they are starring in a period drama when in fact they're in a nursing home for the tragically bewildered. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 12, 2019
62% It Chapter Two (2019) It just isn't good enough. I can't take It any more. I'm over It. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2019
90% The Souvenir (2019) The skill of the film lies in how coolly its evidence is assembled. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 28, 2019
97% Pain and Glory (Dolor y gloria) (2019) [Antonio] Banderas has a tentative charm - he is always holding something in reserve - and is captivating in an encounter with an old flame, Federico, but he's fighting a losing battle against the lugubriousness of the material. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 22, 2019
85% Once Upon a Time In Hollywood (2019) If Once Upon a Time... falls a long way short of meaningful, it still deserves credit for groping in its graceless way towards profound ideas about the restorative miracles of cinema and the consolation of lies projected at 24 frames per second. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2019
86% Animals (2019) The debauchery on screen sometimes feels like an overcompensation for a lack of authenticity. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 1, 2019
100% The Chambermaid (La camarista) (2019) Avilés's disconcerting film takes us from the starched suites to the service lifts, laundries and back corridors hidden from view. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2019
53% The Lion King (2019) Restaging a superannuated property such as The Lion King can leave decent performers with nothing to play with, no meat on the bone. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
56% The Dead Don't Die (2019) The appeal of the film's practised and deliberate amateurism is exhausted fairly quickly. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2019
90% Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019) The picture does a fair bit of narrative slaloming, each new twist revealing an ever-more exasperating switcheroo. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2019
63% Yesterday (2019) If Yesterday is a failure it is because, it lacks the sort of robust rules that are crucial to the most far-fetched fantasy. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2019
89% Sometimes Always Never (Triple Word Score) (2020) The director Carl Hunter, formerly the bassist of the Liverpudlian band the Farm, puts rather too much faith in quirkiness to see the film through. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2019
80% Late Night (2019) Though the film is about people striving for comic excellence, its own quality control hints that mediocre is good enough; it's stuck between 30 Rock and a hard place. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 5, 2019
60% Sunset (Napszállta) (2019) All the good intentions in the world can't compensate for an audience's alienation, and with nothing to sustain the suspense from one scene to the next, it dwindles away after an hour. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted May 29, 2019
89% Rocketman (2019) Crushingly literal... More redolent of a Christmas round-robin letter than of anything resembling cinema. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted May 21, 2019
96% Birds of Passage (Pájaros de verano) (2019) A film of unshowy and eye-opening surprises, which leads its audience somewhere previously unexplored by cinema: into the dream lives of drug lords. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted May 15, 2019
83% High Life (2019) In working without exteriors, Denis sacrifices a crucial component of her range... For all its intimacy, it says less about the isolating expanse of mortality than it does about the limitations of a Claire Denis movie shot entirely in the studio. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted May 9, 2019
61% Vox Lux (2018) Corbet's thesis that a world in thrall to spectacle risks conflating hedonism with horror has a strong whiff of the undergraduate about it. In practice, though, his movie is a satisfying experience that consistently resists hysteria. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted May 1, 2019
99% Eighth Grade (2018) The movie catches every marginal cringing embarrassment and each infinitesimal joy. Very little happens in it, and yet everything does. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2019
81% Mid90s (2018) The dingy cinematography and abrasive score scream authenticity, but Mid90s hits every last beat of the coming-of-age movie... Mostly the film strives desperately for effect over logic. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2019
93% Wild Rose (2019) Jessie Buckley... makes a mighty impact in Wild Rose. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2019
90% Happy as Lazzaro (Lazzaro felice) (2018) Rohrwacher handles the shifts of tone gracefully, as she did in The Wonders, which also explored the tension between a rustic idyll and the modern world. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2019
52% Die Hard: With a Vengeance (1995) The first 40 minutes of the movie contain the most giddy and intoxicating action scenes you'll find in any cinema this summer. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 1, 2019
29% Empire Records (1995) It was never on the cards that Allan Moyle, the director of Pump Up the Volume, would deliver an authentic study of modern youth with his new film Empire Records. But the picture is barely even set on this planet, let alone in this era. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2019
3/5 67% The Break (1998) The film is over-ambitious, yet the confident direction of Robert Dornhelm helps it hang together. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2019
2/5 14% Persons Unknown (1996) [Director George] Hickenlooper himself cannot get a firm grasp on the trashy noir dynamics of the piece, and by the final 20 minutes, all credibility and sympathy has dissolved. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2019
3/5 57% Tomorrow Never Dies (1997) Despite the film's faults, David Arnold's score, which layers industrialised sounds over traditional orchestration, can make some sequences seem more exciting than they actually are. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 28, 2019
3/5 42% I Know What You Did Last Summer (1997) Tthe frights come fairly regularly, and though the picture neither haunts nor tickles you the way Scream did, it's diverting enough as mindless Saturday-night entertainment. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2019
98% 3 Faces (2019) Panahi has already made one decisive study of gender oppression (his fiery 2006 comedy Offside...) and it is into this territory that 3 Faces proceeds with warmth, curiosity and ultimately anger. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 27, 2019
43% Space Jam (1996) Space Jam is nothing if not a product made by men who gauge a film's success by how many soft toys it spawns. - Independent (UK) EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2019
93% Us (2019) Us represents a definite advance on Get Out, and establishes Peele as a fascinating film-maker. When he learns to stop over-complicating things, he may even become a great one, too. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 21, 2019
95% Ray & Liz (2019) The lives we see are eked out on the breadline with an air of desperation and feverishness. Yet Daniel Landin's cinematography captures them affectionately. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 15, 2019
58% Under the Silver Lake (2019) Pop culture can furnish us with potent hits of meaning, and the film rejoices in that. But it also asks what happens when they eclipse or outstrip lived experience. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 14, 2019
78% Captain Marvel (2019) Vital to the success of Captain Marvel is Larson, whose amused intelligence warms the movie through like Carol's hands heating a kettle. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2019
92% Fighting with My Family (2019) Fighting with My Family is a rare and delightful beast: a movie that seems to understand the world of professional wrestling. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2019
No Score Yet Women of Mafia 2 (Kobiety mafii 2) (2019) The absence of a moral component, or some indication that what we're seeing isn't meant to be titillating, renders the film about as enjoyable as surgery without anaesthetic. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2019
86% Hannah (2018) It's a bit rum to make a sophisticated performer go through the motions in this way. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2019
90% Capernaum (Capharnaüm) (2018) Labaki directs the inexperienced cast sensitively, and mixes appalled commentary on the bureaucracy conspiring against the disenfranchised with the occasional indelible image. - New Statesman EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 21, 2019