Siddhant Adlakha

Siddhant Adlakha
Tomatometer-approved critic

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
89% Inglourious Basterds (2009) Tarantino's Western-inspired fantasy acts as a real-world corrective of how the Nazis perhaps ought to be seen - with utmost scorn - and in what context this sort of cinematic violence can, and even should, be indulgent. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2019
No Score Yet Bring the Soul: The Movie (2019) Bring The Soul is, at the end of the day, adequate. For a band well on their way to all-time stardom, though, "adequate" can't help but feel frustrating. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
No Score Yet Burn The Stage: The Movie (2018) Burn the Stage is poetic, intimate and often hilarious. - Polygon EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2019
83% The Other Side of the Wind (2018) What we're seeing isn't so much an Orson Welles film about the unknowability of the artist as it is that very unknowability made manifest. We were never going to see what Welles had originally intended; perhaps this best-case-scenario is rightfully obtuse - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
94% Wildlife (2018) Wildlife is an immense first feature that plays like an actor's dream. It lives in the beats between dialogue, capturing something fundamentally human in the process. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
95% The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) (2019) The entire feel of the film shifts at times, often mid-scene, as Sinan attempts to craft a personal history while trying to break free from the shackles of history at large. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
89% Non-Fiction (Doubles vies) (2019) The film's French title Double vies (or Double Lives) hints not only at the many extra-marital affairs lurking beneath the film's surface, but at the duality of life lived in the digital age. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
83% Her Smell (2019) The film's snaking long-takes and harsh lighting create a lurid texture, helped along by a bold sound-mix that turns every drugged out, Shakespearean monologue by the impeccable Moss into a waking nightmare. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
93% The Favourite (2018) The three leads astonish in their respective roles, beginning from a place of madcap frenzy before their performances transition slowly toward subtlety and nuance, as they begin to bare their souls. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
92% Cold War (Zimna wojna) (2018) Zula and Wiktor age as the years pass, not only in body and attire, but in their very souls, becoming weighed down by political chess games they've been forced to become a part of. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
80% At Eternity's Gate (2018) Dafoe's van Gogh searches, desperately, for ways in which to share his visions of the world and its eternal secrets, in a film that could not be more uniquely conceived. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
99% Ash Is Purest White (2019) Led be immensely pained performances from Tao Zhao and Fan Liao, who carry the weight of guilt, betrayal and a rapidly changing society on their shoulders, the film brings in to focus the ways in which forces larger than ourselves end up molding our lives - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
98% 3 Faces (2019) A bizarre journey of cultural discovery, immersing themselves in distant languages, customs and beliefs in order to find answers, like reconnecting with roots they didn't know they had lost. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
100% Supa Modo (2018) Supa Modo is a delicate film, one that even manages to be joyful at times. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
94% Rafiki (2019) It proves to be one of the rare films of its ilk that post-scripts realistic atrocities with a promise of a life fully lived, even after the trauma. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
95% Creed (2015) Adonis' presence splits the cinematic illusion like a prism, as it hops back and forth between fighters. In one moment, Adonis punches alongside Apollo, embracing his legacy. In the next, he rejects it, fighting Apollo himself. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
96% Roma (2018) If the streaming giant's theatrical rollout finds its way to your vicinity, you owe yourself the unique experience of sitting down in a seat in order to walk through someone else's memory. It's like nothing you've ever heard or seen. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
87% Annihilation (2018) The story reverberates, echoing through the characters' skin and voice and very sense of being. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
96% BlacKkKlansman (2018) Arguably Lee's best film since 25th Hour, he re-cements himself as one of America's premiere cinematic voices. Not only does he craft yet another ode to the beauty of blackness, he also taps into a particular cognitive dissonance plaguing modern America. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
100% Paddington 2 (2018) Everything from the sweet, precisely melodramatic performances to the King's mile-a-minute setups and payoffs works like a charm. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
83% High Life (2019) The moving haze of memory forms a collective portrait of life as it's lived, often in the vast openness of nature - in contrast to the inmates planting fauna in the confines of a lab. As if we're seeing the living memories of the film itself. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
94% Blindspotting (2018) What feels like the most slept-on film of 2018, Blindspotting is, above all else, a magnificent performance piece. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
No Score Yet Bhasmasur (2017) Nishil Sheth and D.P. Shrish Tomar explore, through Tipu and Dhaanu's eyes, the beauty and hardships of rural India, from the contours of the broken ground to the golden sunlight shimmering off its surface. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
56% Kaala (2018) Ranjith and cinematographer Murali G. capture a locale that, both in Indian and Western cinema, has rarely been shown this lovingly. They explore its nooks, crannies, people and cultures, in what amounts to the most exciting Indian film this year. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
No Score Yet Ma.Ama (2018) A haunting, melodic work reminiscent of Apichatpong Weerasethakul, MAAMA follows one man's late-in-life spiritual awakening, brought on by both the crushing weight of mortality and, not unrelatedly, the spectre of lifelong regret. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 7, 2019
99% Shoplifters (Manbiki kazoku) (2018) There's a musicality to absolutely everything in the film, from petty thieving at corner stores to conversations around a crowded dinner table. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
86% The Third Murder (Sandome no satsujin) (2018) The Third Murder is shot mostly through panes of prison glass. In tackling the weighty subject of Japan's death penalty, the director imbues his meditative mystery with a distinctly icy chill. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2019
95% If Beale Street Could Talk (2019) When KiKi Layne's Tish and Stephan James' Fonny make love for the first time, If Beale Street Could Talk cuts to a golden light shimmering off the surface of a jazz record. It spins, unevenly but with purpose, carrying with it the weight of history. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
100% A Family Tour (2018) Ying captures quiet, often invisible torment from afar, allowing scenes to play out in unbroken master shots that create a disconnect between the characters' paranoia and the normality of their surroundings. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
81% Mid90s (2018) Mid90s is a brilliant little delight that portrays the ridiculousness of adolescent masculinity, but it's also thoughtful enough to take it seriously. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
89% The Image Book (Le livre d'image) (2019) Even at eighty-seven years of age, Jean-Luc Godard remains one of cinema's most ferocious, most transgressive voices, forcing us to look past the cinematic world we've grown comfortable with - a world he helped create in the first place. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
70% Climax (2019) One of the most unsettling depictions of Hell ever put on screen. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
89% A Private War (2018) For a film that wants desperately to paint a portrait of a woman to whom the lives of war casualties were of utmost concern, A Private War makes Marie Colvin's struggles so private as to sever them from the people whose tragedies set them in motion. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2019
100% Noblemen (2019) [Vandana] Kataria's Noblemen, while largely withheld to a point of minimalism, bursts sporadically with an unsettling energy as it explores the circumstances in which monsters create more monsters. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2019
100% Manta Ray (2018) The film's final ten minutes feel like a dream, of home and comfort, turned into a nightmare. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
93% Travelers and Magicians (2005) Travelers and Magicians is deeply affecting. It plays, in itself, like an act of reconciliation, arriving at answers that seek not to bridge impossible physical and cultural gaps, but to guide one as they navigate the journey between them. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
No Score Yet Fandry (2013) A soulful portrait of character, place and memory, told from the lens of a tumultuous childhood. It builds, incisively, to a stunning, saddening, even enraging climax, holding accountable those who would uphold the perceived normality of caste oppression. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2019
90% Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019) Marvel's 23rd entry feels not like an epilogue to the main story, but a request for a clean slate; a plea for its audience to forget the failings of its films and characters, and to instead accept their iconography at a distance. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2019
8/10 87% Diamantino (2019) It speaks to the head-spinning era in which we find ourselves, hopping between genre tropes at break-neck speed in to capture the absurdity of the current political moment and how we engage with it. - Slashfilm EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 25, 2019
36% Sanju (2018) The film demands sympathy for a symbol-not of hope or strife, but of privilege. It demands empathy for an empty vessel, embodying a rich, nepotistic, narcissistic status quo, without putting in the groundwork to craft character through visual expression. - Observer EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
No Score Yet BTS World Tour Love Yourself In Seoul (2019) If you've ever wondered what it was like to be alive during Beatlemania, watching a BTS concert film with a sold-out ARMY crowd is a pretty fitting parallel. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
100% Bulbul Can Sing (2018) Das' eye for naturalism is commendable, but the existence of a creation as singular as this, telling a tale that feels so new and endearing, is a worthwhile story on its own. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
82% Aamis (Ravening) (2019) The film is rife with metaphors about repression and the all-consuming nature of romance, but it works best as a literal document of two people with a strange shared passion, one which complicates their already complicated predicament. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
100% Driveways (2019) In Ahn's America, outsider experiences of race and sexuality are treated as mundane norms, while the mundane activities of suburban normalcy become their own eccentric journeys. A trip to the supermarket is an opportunity to accept mortality. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
No Score Yet Stray Dolls (2019) It feels like a crime film lasered on to a tale of a sheltered Indian girl, thrown into the chaotic world of American college. On one hand, the beats feel emotionally honest. On the other, it meanders without fully embracing its aesthetic transposition. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
88% Burning Cane (2019) There's a jaded harshness to Burning Cane. Its stylistic flourishes make it feel like a modern ghost story at times; a fitting outcome, given its tale of spiritual inheritance. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
77% Skin (2019) The meta-textual questions of timing are inescapable - Why this story? Why now? - though even taken at its word, as a straightforward tale of reform, Skin offers little by way of insight into reformation, let alone modern racism. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
91% Sir (2018) There's a tangible sense of excitement to something as simple as Ashwin and Ratna passing each other in the hallway, and an equally potent sense of danger when they interact while in the presence of other people. What might they let slip? - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
88% Blinded by the Light (2019) Blinded by the Light is a breath of fresh air, though not because it feels new or unconventional. Rather, it deals strictly with the familiar (for better and for worse), though it does so with incredible passion. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019
77% Leto (2019) Its boundary-breaking musical numbers feel like the spirit of rebellious creativity embodied, and every frame exudes a joyous sense of freedom. - Firstpost EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2019