End of the Century Reviews

  • Nov 11, 2019

    It was somewhat obscure but overall good rhythm and acting. Having goat cheese, bread and white wine by the Barcelona sunset reflected the sensuality and simplicity of this pleasant movie. Perfect pastime even when you suspect you don't follow the script completely.

    It was somewhat obscure but overall good rhythm and acting. Having goat cheese, bread and white wine by the Barcelona sunset reflected the sensuality and simplicity of this pleasant movie. Perfect pastime even when you suspect you don't follow the script completely.

  • Oct 27, 2019

    Lucio Castro's film begins in a rather mundane and wordless manner as we see Juan Barberini's Ocho arrives at his Barcelona Airbnb. He wanders around the city, cruise on Grindr and goes to the beach. That's when he sees Ramon Pujol's Javi again and eventually they hook up. So far, so conventional queer cinema. However, Castro then throws us a curveball (and not for the only time in this film) just before the end of the first act and it jumps back 20 years earlier. The set-up is typical of gay romantic drama of this ilk but the writer-director has remodelled it and gives it a shiny and original sheen. What I thought the film was initially turns out, happily, to be quite different from what it eventually becomes: a queer Before Sunrise sliced with the DNA of Sliding Doors that takes a melancholic look at love, hope and missed opportunities and how we change as the world around us, and also in this instance gay life, have changed in the intervening two decades. Filmed with often stationary long takes, Castro develops a style that seems appropriate to the material as if we become silent observers soaking up the intimacy of either a conversation over cheese and wine or a sizzling encounter between two hot guys. There are moments when the film veers on the pretentious side and despite the director's justification during the Q&A afterwards that it was a deliberate decision to keep the same actors and the same look for the characters as they play both their younger and the older selves, I find it a little confusing at first and unnecessarily distracting. Those small quibbles aside, I've nevertheless enjoyed this contemplative and enigmatic film that refreshingly reshapes familiar elements into something appealing and rather romantic.


    Lucio Castro's film begins in a rather mundane and wordless manner as we see Juan Barberini's Ocho arrives at his Barcelona Airbnb. He wanders around the city, cruise on Grindr and goes to the beach. That's when he sees Ramon Pujol's Javi again and eventually they hook up. So far, so conventional queer cinema. However, Castro then throws us a curveball (and not for the only time in this film) just before the end of the first act and it jumps back 20 years earlier. The set-up is typical of gay romantic drama of this ilk but the writer-director has remodelled it and gives it a shiny and original sheen. What I thought the film was initially turns out, happily, to be quite different from what it eventually becomes: a queer Before Sunrise sliced with the DNA of Sliding Doors that takes a melancholic look at love, hope and missed opportunities and how we change as the world around us, and also in this instance gay life, have changed in the intervening two decades. Filmed with often stationary long takes, Castro develops a style that seems appropriate to the material as if we become silent observers soaking up the intimacy of either a conversation over cheese and wine or a sizzling encounter between two hot guys. There are moments when the film veers on the pretentious side and despite the director's justification during the Q&A afterwards that it was a deliberate decision to keep the same actors and the same look for the characters as they play both their younger and the older selves, I find it a little confusing at first and unnecessarily distracting. Those small quibbles aside, I've nevertheless enjoyed this contemplative and enigmatic film that refreshingly reshapes familiar elements into something appealing and rather romantic.


  • Oct 19, 2019

    A beautifully made ,sensuous Argentine film,done with imagination,with a perfect cast who bring us into the lives and minds of the characters.Not a predictable gay romcom at all.

    A beautifully made ,sensuous Argentine film,done with imagination,with a perfect cast who bring us into the lives and minds of the characters.Not a predictable gay romcom at all.

  • Oct 11, 2019

    Dreadful film. Script completely unrealistic (I mean the script not the plot) e.g. throwing up in disgust over his first sexual experience (I did that too) but to then — within 1-2 days shag your friend's bf in her flat? 😳 Took 90% of the movie to get interesting with its twist and then lost its nerve to end you wondering what was the point. Very distracting and self-indulgent use of narrow depth of field focus in almost every shot especially obsessed with three layering it all the time I.e blurred object in foreground, in focus subject then blurred background.

    Dreadful film. Script completely unrealistic (I mean the script not the plot) e.g. throwing up in disgust over his first sexual experience (I did that too) but to then — within 1-2 days shag your friend's bf in her flat? 😳 Took 90% of the movie to get interesting with its twist and then lost its nerve to end you wondering what was the point. Very distracting and self-indulgent use of narrow depth of field focus in almost every shot especially obsessed with three layering it all the time I.e blurred object in foreground, in focus subject then blurred background.

  • Sep 22, 2019

    Very challenging but haunting almost-love story.

    Very challenging but haunting almost-love story.

  • Sep 05, 2019

    Otter's erotica written for an audience 10 years ago.

    Otter's erotica written for an audience 10 years ago.