Everyday Black Man Reviews

  • Sep 03, 2019

    Just add this stereotypical trash to all the other media designed with the purpose of teaching Black people to distrust, hate, and kill one another. This one reaches a new low of character assassinating Nation of Islam men. I'm so disappointed with all the Black people associated with this GARBAGE, especially OMARI HARDWICK. The Black female who created this crap is the live version of the smiling face killing the community for profit. She is Malik in real life. Rather than writing a story of the brother finding his way to the right path, she takes the predictable slimey way out and kills all the Black men in a movie she named "Everyday Black Man". Ridiculous! Every Black man (and the women that love them) should be pissed after watching this.

    Just add this stereotypical trash to all the other media designed with the purpose of teaching Black people to distrust, hate, and kill one another. This one reaches a new low of character assassinating Nation of Islam men. I'm so disappointed with all the Black people associated with this GARBAGE, especially OMARI HARDWICK. The Black female who created this crap is the live version of the smiling face killing the community for profit. She is Malik in real life. Rather than writing a story of the brother finding his way to the right path, she takes the predictable slimey way out and kills all the Black men in a movie she named "Everyday Black Man". Ridiculous! Every Black man (and the women that love them) should be pissed after watching this.

  • Nov 28, 2015

    This is an excellent movie showing the inner city conflict. It's like breathing. It never slows enough for you to be bored.

    This is an excellent movie showing the inner city conflict. It's like breathing. It never slows enough for you to be bored.

  • Nov 18, 2015

    fairly decent movie that was TOTALLY RUINED by a REALLY RETARDED ending.

    fairly decent movie that was TOTALLY RUINED by a REALLY RETARDED ending.

  • Jul 10, 2012

    Omari Hardwick's character was so mean :(

    Omari Hardwick's character was so mean :(

  • Aug 28, 2011

    Everyday Black Man was well intentioned if predictable movie. Henry Brown plays Moses, a reformed drug dealer, who thought he left his Scarface past by opening a small general store in a rougher part of Oakland, CA. Of course the store is failing and desperate Moses decides to take a helping hand-out from a seemingly righteous N.O.I. disciple named Malik--played by Omari Hardwick in a surprisingly subtle performance. But things quickly turn dark when duped Moses starts to see the full extent of Malik's thriving Muslim Bakery. The movie is best when dealing in little understated moments like the budding romance between Malik and Claire (Tessa Thompson), who turns out to be Moses' long lost daughter. But when director/ writer Carmen Madden cranks up the morality meter the film's second act devolves into a beat-you-over-the-head parable about the evils of drugs in the black community replete with misogyny, over abundance of the n-word and gunplay. The eventual shaky cam showdown between Moses and Malik ends with a bloodied Moses shaking his fist heavenward reminiscent of Laurence Fishburn pointing to his watch in the final scene of Spike Lee's self-righteous musical School Daze. This movie could have been extraordinary but Everyday Black Man was an everyday run-of-the-mill movie.

    Everyday Black Man was well intentioned if predictable movie. Henry Brown plays Moses, a reformed drug dealer, who thought he left his Scarface past by opening a small general store in a rougher part of Oakland, CA. Of course the store is failing and desperate Moses decides to take a helping hand-out from a seemingly righteous N.O.I. disciple named Malik--played by Omari Hardwick in a surprisingly subtle performance. But things quickly turn dark when duped Moses starts to see the full extent of Malik's thriving Muslim Bakery. The movie is best when dealing in little understated moments like the budding romance between Malik and Claire (Tessa Thompson), who turns out to be Moses' long lost daughter. But when director/ writer Carmen Madden cranks up the morality meter the film's second act devolves into a beat-you-over-the-head parable about the evils of drugs in the black community replete with misogyny, over abundance of the n-word and gunplay. The eventual shaky cam showdown between Moses and Malik ends with a bloodied Moses shaking his fist heavenward reminiscent of Laurence Fishburn pointing to his watch in the final scene of Spike Lee's self-righteous musical School Daze. This movie could have been extraordinary but Everyday Black Man was an everyday run-of-the-mill movie.