The Green Mile Reviews

  • 1d ago

    Great movie from alot of great actors from when Tom Hanks had alot of good roles 👍👍

    Great movie from alot of great actors from when Tom Hanks had alot of good roles 👍👍

  • Nov 30, 2019

    Doing justice to Stephen King's novel, 'The Green Mile' offers movie goers a thoughtful and intelligent experience. With a strong performance by Tom Hanks, the film incorporates multiple themes that work in harmony to bring the film to another level.

    Doing justice to Stephen King's novel, 'The Green Mile' offers movie goers a thoughtful and intelligent experience. With a strong performance by Tom Hanks, the film incorporates multiple themes that work in harmony to bring the film to another level.

  • Nov 04, 2019

    King and Hanks . A masterpiece of cinema.

    King and Hanks . A masterpiece of cinema.

  • Oct 25, 2019

    absorbing, emotionally powerful experience

    absorbing, emotionally powerful experience

  • Oct 21, 2019

    One of Hanks best performances ever. It's long, but it's worth every second.

    One of Hanks best performances ever. It's long, but it's worth every second.

  • Oct 19, 2019

    I can't stop crying.

    I can't stop crying.

  • Sep 30, 2019

    An amazing film. Very powerful, with Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan earning their stripes.

    An amazing film. Very powerful, with Tom Hanks and Michael Clarke Duncan earning their stripes.

  • Sep 15, 2019

    Sometimes a bit too long winded, but still full of sentimental drama and intrigue.

    Sometimes a bit too long winded, but still full of sentimental drama and intrigue.

  • Sep 14, 2019

    Great performances and a frank darabont masterpiece

    Great performances and a frank darabont masterpiece

  • Sep 11, 2019

    A deep dive in human empathy. Director Frank Darabont's fantasy drama The Green Mile (1999) is a breathtaking achievement combining cinematic beauty, relatable human experience, and brilliant character acting. Darabont brings Stephen King's novel to life as a testament to the power of understanding emotional distress and suffering. All human fear is captured within several death row prison guards and their inmates. We see men willing to either empathize with the pain of those around them or cause atrocious harm to others for their own sadistic intentions. Thomas Newman's beautiful score creeps in for just the most emotional sequences to help build a sense of wonder. The grim lighting reaches its peak with one of cinema's most haunting shots as a man's life is taken during an execution and the frame is centered on Tom Hanks crying while the lights blow out in a triumphant showing of lighting, acting, writing, direction, and cinematography. Darabont achieves film excellence with what I consider his greatest film. That is saying something as he also directed The Shawshank Redemption. The Green Mile is just deeper, universal, and devastating throughout its massive run-time of endless emotional sequences. Furthermore, the fantasy aspect comes with Michael Clarke Duncan's poignant and moving performance as the simple-minded and big-hearted giant named John. Duncan's most touching acting is within his tender eyes, trembling voice, and soft movements in The Green Mile. He gets to portray a sensitive man that can take on the pain of others around him, relieving the agony of everyone he touches. Michael Clarke Duncan died too soon as I wish he got to do more dramatic roles like The Green Mile, but he gifted us with his astonishing display of the empathetic miracle man for The Green Mile. Tom Hanks is perfect as the death row "Green Mile" guard boss Paul. His eyes and mouth exhibit a stunning amount of emotional force that is the key to The Green Mile's success. He's an everyman whom the audience can always relate to compared to the crazy inmates, kindly guards, cruel guards, corrupt officials, and fantasy sequences. Hanks finds an emotional center to his performance that rivals his work in Road to Perdition and Catch Me If You Can. Hanks is actually underappreciated for creating a genuine sense of sympathy and expressive faces. David Morse gives his greatest performance too as the hulking, yet considerate good guard Brutus. His name is ironic considering Brutus is loyal and kindly with a stern hand only for the wicked. Morse is a fantastic counterpart for Tom Hanks to act off of in most scenes. Similarly, Barry Pepper's sympathetic guard Dean is an emotional core for The Green Mile. He always does his job, while also considering his wards. I feel the same about the skeptical and nice Harry, played by the steadfast Jeffrey DeMunn. Bonnie Hunt is great as Hanks' caring and patient wife. James Cromwell delivers a phenomenal performance as a grieving husband worn down by his wife's illness as well as a prison warden who is willing to overlook the rules for people with connections. Speaking of which, you love to hate Doug Hutchinson as the sadistic Percy. His sniveling, cruel, and brutal role represents all the thoughtless prison guards ever to abuse an inmate. He also persists as a classic example of nepotism, narcissism, toxic masculinity, cowardice, and hypocrisy. His thoughtful performance, on the other hand, is unforgettable as the loathsome Percy is forever ingrained in the viewer's mind as the man that stepped on a cute little mouse. On a similar note, Sam Rockwell gives a dark turn as the monstrous Wharton. His incessant teasing and grotesque actions make him one of cinema's sleaziest villains. Michael Jeter is a real tear jerker as the French Creole man Delacroix. His heavy accent is beyond impressive as he just assumes this very difficult character with such a specific accent. His tears bring the same to your eyes. He's a highly sympathetic character who gets arguably the most horrific end to anyone in any film. Likewise, Graham Greene gives a quiet, yet moving performance as the native man condemned to death named Arlen. Patricia Clarkson gets a beautiful role as the infected character Melinda. She is such a ray of sunshine and empathy. You can just tell how warm Clarkson is by her portrayal. Harry Dean Stanton gets a hilarious role as the insane janitor and electric chair rehearsal subject Toot Toot. You will love Gary Sinise's cameo role as Burt. His monologue about the potential evil in some men is haunting and captivating thanks to Sinise's sincere depiction. In all, The Green Mile is simply a feast for fantastic acting expressive and empathetic alike. Darabont's direction is dazzling and grips you the entire duration. It never overstays its welcome thanks to its heartfelt message and poignant performances.

    A deep dive in human empathy. Director Frank Darabont's fantasy drama The Green Mile (1999) is a breathtaking achievement combining cinematic beauty, relatable human experience, and brilliant character acting. Darabont brings Stephen King's novel to life as a testament to the power of understanding emotional distress and suffering. All human fear is captured within several death row prison guards and their inmates. We see men willing to either empathize with the pain of those around them or cause atrocious harm to others for their own sadistic intentions. Thomas Newman's beautiful score creeps in for just the most emotional sequences to help build a sense of wonder. The grim lighting reaches its peak with one of cinema's most haunting shots as a man's life is taken during an execution and the frame is centered on Tom Hanks crying while the lights blow out in a triumphant showing of lighting, acting, writing, direction, and cinematography. Darabont achieves film excellence with what I consider his greatest film. That is saying something as he also directed The Shawshank Redemption. The Green Mile is just deeper, universal, and devastating throughout its massive run-time of endless emotional sequences. Furthermore, the fantasy aspect comes with Michael Clarke Duncan's poignant and moving performance as the simple-minded and big-hearted giant named John. Duncan's most touching acting is within his tender eyes, trembling voice, and soft movements in The Green Mile. He gets to portray a sensitive man that can take on the pain of others around him, relieving the agony of everyone he touches. Michael Clarke Duncan died too soon as I wish he got to do more dramatic roles like The Green Mile, but he gifted us with his astonishing display of the empathetic miracle man for The Green Mile. Tom Hanks is perfect as the death row "Green Mile" guard boss Paul. His eyes and mouth exhibit a stunning amount of emotional force that is the key to The Green Mile's success. He's an everyman whom the audience can always relate to compared to the crazy inmates, kindly guards, cruel guards, corrupt officials, and fantasy sequences. Hanks finds an emotional center to his performance that rivals his work in Road to Perdition and Catch Me If You Can. Hanks is actually underappreciated for creating a genuine sense of sympathy and expressive faces. David Morse gives his greatest performance too as the hulking, yet considerate good guard Brutus. His name is ironic considering Brutus is loyal and kindly with a stern hand only for the wicked. Morse is a fantastic counterpart for Tom Hanks to act off of in most scenes. Similarly, Barry Pepper's sympathetic guard Dean is an emotional core for The Green Mile. He always does his job, while also considering his wards. I feel the same about the skeptical and nice Harry, played by the steadfast Jeffrey DeMunn. Bonnie Hunt is great as Hanks' caring and patient wife. James Cromwell delivers a phenomenal performance as a grieving husband worn down by his wife's illness as well as a prison warden who is willing to overlook the rules for people with connections. Speaking of which, you love to hate Doug Hutchinson as the sadistic Percy. His sniveling, cruel, and brutal role represents all the thoughtless prison guards ever to abuse an inmate. He also persists as a classic example of nepotism, narcissism, toxic masculinity, cowardice, and hypocrisy. His thoughtful performance, on the other hand, is unforgettable as the loathsome Percy is forever ingrained in the viewer's mind as the man that stepped on a cute little mouse. On a similar note, Sam Rockwell gives a dark turn as the monstrous Wharton. His incessant teasing and grotesque actions make him one of cinema's sleaziest villains. Michael Jeter is a real tear jerker as the French Creole man Delacroix. His heavy accent is beyond impressive as he just assumes this very difficult character with such a specific accent. His tears bring the same to your eyes. He's a highly sympathetic character who gets arguably the most horrific end to anyone in any film. Likewise, Graham Greene gives a quiet, yet moving performance as the native man condemned to death named Arlen. Patricia Clarkson gets a beautiful role as the infected character Melinda. She is such a ray of sunshine and empathy. You can just tell how warm Clarkson is by her portrayal. Harry Dean Stanton gets a hilarious role as the insane janitor and electric chair rehearsal subject Toot Toot. You will love Gary Sinise's cameo role as Burt. His monologue about the potential evil in some men is haunting and captivating thanks to Sinise's sincere depiction. In all, The Green Mile is simply a feast for fantastic acting expressive and empathetic alike. Darabont's direction is dazzling and grips you the entire duration. It never overstays its welcome thanks to its heartfelt message and poignant performances.